Was FBI Investigating Hunter Biden Connections To Child Pornography?

A senior Republican official acknowledged the potential that the FBI investigate whether or not there was child pornography on the laptop and hard drive that was owned by the Hunter Biden.

Fox News Journalist Maria Bartiromo asked Senator Ron Johnson who chairs the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee about a report from Business Insider.


He responded with:


“I think you just made the connection. Again, this is what the FBI, I think, has to come clean about,” the Wisconsin Republican said in his first reply. Johnson was alluding to his letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray about the laptop sent last week.

Pressed a second time after his initial response, the senator said he could not comment any further.


“I don’t want to speculate, other than to say that — what I said publicly before. Our report uncovered so many troubling connections, so many things that need to be investigated, that I really think we’re just scratching the surface,” Johnson said. “And, yes, I have heard all kinds of things that I think will probably be revealed over the next few days.”

According to Business Insider:


The article included a photo of the federal-court subpoena showing that the FBI seized the computer and hard drive in December. It’s unclear why the bureau subpoenaed or seized the hardware after the repair shop’s owner voluntarily told authorities of its existence.

But the first photo in the Post story, depicting the cover page of the subpoena, offers additional clues. If you look closely, you’ll notice the faint outlines of handwriting, between and behind the printed text, that seem to suggest something was written on the reverse side of the page. This would make sense, as the blank subpoena — Form AO 110 — contains a second page to be filled out by the agent who serves it.


Reversing the image of the first page, and superimposing it on a blank version of the subpoena’s second page, clearly shows that the placement of the faint handwriting lines up with the placement of the various fields and design elements of the second page. The same handwriting indicates that the subpoena was served to a person or entity with four relatively short names, the third and fourth of which appear to begin with a capital “M” and a capital “I.”  The owner of The Mac Shop appears to be a man named John Paul Mac Isaac.

Further analysis of the subpoena’s faint handwriting suggests it was served by an FBI agent who listed their address as the bureau’s satellite office in downtown Wilmington. The name of the server, though not 100% legible, appears to be “Joshua Wilson.” Over the past decade, a number of news outlets have quoted or described an FBI agent with the same name.


Last year, The Star-Ledger newspaper described Wilson as “an FBI agent based in New Jersey who has spent nearly five years working full time on child pornography.

According to the Washinton Examiner:


The subpoena appeared to show the FBI agent who served it was someone named “Joshua Wilson.” There was a Joshua Wilson, according to a Star-Ledger report published last year, who was an FBI agent based in New Jersey who spent nearly five years investigating child pornography, but it remains unclear if this is the same Wilson and what exactly the bureau was investigating.

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